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Where to Buy a Whole Hog for Barbecuing

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Whole- and Part-Animal Reservation Form; Meat Club

Choosing a pig: I always advise to go local — support the farmers in your area. These are the go-to guys for buying a whole hog because the smaller farms raise heritage breed pigs known for their fat, as opposed to a more economic hog that has been raised for its meat. Fat is flavor!

The prospect of buying a whole hog, nose to tail, with every bristle in between, is an alien concept in the modern world. Where once it was a necessity - a pig would provide both fresh and preserved sustenance for a family for months - it now seems merely excessive. These days we're used to cuts of shrink-wrapped pork sitting under bright supermarket lights.

where to buy a whole pig online - links - exotic meats

  1. Plan ahead for your pig roast! In most areas a whole fresh hog is not that easy to come by. Find a source for a whole hog well before you plan your party.
  2. Talk to your butcher. Most can special order whole pigs. Ethnic markets and butchers, Latin and Asian particularly, are a good place to start. Check out my Where to Buy a Whole Hog for Barbecuing page.
  3. When buying a whole pig, find out if it will come frozen or fresh. If frozen, be sure to leave sufficient time once you get it to defrost. An average sized hog will take at least 48 hours to defrost completely. If you are planning to marinate or brine it as well, this will take additional time before the whole pig roast so plan ahead and make sure you don't run out of time!
  4. Also ask your butcher how the pig will come. Most are prepped for cooking, meaning their hair and internal organs have been removed. If they haven't been prepped, make sure you have someone who can clean and prep the hog for you before cooking.

Mid-Michigan Meats | Buy Local Michigan Pork

I am buying a whole hog and having it processed but I would like to know what cuts I get if I do “this vs. this.” I want ribs, whole loin (which I can cut chops out of myself), of course bacon, and shoulders (for smoked pulled pork), breakfast sausage, maybe some Canadian bacon, hocks and bones and ears for my dogs but I don’t necessarily love a ton of hams. So if I skimp on one thing do you get more of another? How does it breakdown?

The prospect of buying a whole hog, nose to tail, with every bristle in between, is an alien concept in the modern world. Where once it was a necessity - a pig would provide both fresh and preserved sustenance for a family for months - it now seems merely excessive. These days we're used to cuts of shrink-wrapped pork sitting under bright supermarket lights.